Graduate Courses

CPLT 959: Dissertation Workshop

Dissertation preparation course.

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2019

CPLT 961 Inquisitions

This course is an approach to a cultural history of the Inquisition from its inception and methods, to its theories and practices, to its abolition—although, has it ever been totally abolished? We read literary and nonliterary texts about heresy, the Antichrist, auto de fé, religious protest, and magic and witchcraft.

Professor: Jesús Velasco
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2020
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 4:00p.m. - 5:15p.m.

CPLT 968 The End of the World

In this course we study different kinds of narratives about the end of times and its consequences in Iberian and Latin American cultures. We include political, theological, social, and environmental narratives across periodizations in Iberian and Latin American cultures.

Professor: Jesús Velasco
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2020
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 11:35a.m. -12:50p.m.

CPLT 969 Law and the Science of the Soul: Iberian and Mediterranean Connections

This seminar suggests a research project to investigate the affinity between the legal discipline and the science of the soul, or, if you wish, between the science of the soul and the body of law. The point of departure for our framing argument—the existence of this affinity—is that at different moments in history, the legal science (in the form of legal scholarship, religious law, or even legislation) has toiled to appropriate cognitive processes (the external senses, for instance) and post-sensorial operations (imagination, fantasy, memory, etc.). However, this appropriation has become, at different moments in history, so naturalized, so dissolved, so automatized, that it has become invisible for us, and that, because of this invisibility, the affinity can continue doing a political work that is not always evident to us readers, citizens, and clients of the law. In this seminar we read Iberian and Mediterranean primary sources from different confessions, in different languages, and within different legal and political backgrounds—from pre-Socratic thinkers to al-Ghazali, from Averroes and Maimonides to Alfonso X, from Parisian theologians to Spinoza, etc. Likewise, we read theoretical work that allow us to conceptualize the kind of research we are doing.

Professor: Jesús Velasco
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2021
Day/Time: Thursday, 1:30p.m. - 3:20p.m.

CPLT 986: Decolonizing Memory

This seminar introduces students to theories of memory, testimony, and trauma by bringing key works on these topics into dialogue with literary texts by writers of the former French and British empires in Africa. Literary readings may include works by Djebar, Ouologuem, Farès, Salih, Head, Aidoo. Theoretical readings by Arendt, Adorno and Horkheimer, Agamben, Césaire, Derrida, Fanon, Foucault, Mbembe, Spivak.

Professor: Jill Jarvis
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2018