Graduate Courses

CPLT 561: Performance and Postdramatic Theater

This course explores the “postdramatic theatre” (Hans-Thies Lehmann) of Heiner Müller, Elfriede Jelinek, René Pollesch, and others. In close readings of Hamletmaschine, Die Schutzbefohlenen, and Kill Your Darlings we trace how the appearance of bodies and media on stage is foregrounded instead of the dramatic plot, and how the emphasis on the theatrical apparatus questions the primacy of dramatis personae and the theatrical illusion. Readings of dramatic texts and analyses of performance videos are accompanied by discussions of theoretical texts on performativity, theatricality, and subjectification. Topics include the history of theater, play, and drama; conceptions of performance and theatricality; subjectivity and authority; and the reentry of the text within the theatrical play.

Course is multi titled as GMAN663

Instructor Katrin Trüstedt

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: Thursday, 3:30p.m. - 5:20pm

This course explores the “postdramatic theatre” (Hans-Thies Lehmann) of Heiner Müller, Elfriede Jelinek, René Pollesch, and others. In close readings of Hamletmaschine, Die Schutzbefohlenen, and Kill Your Darlings we trace how the appearance of bodies and media on stage is foregrounded instead of the dramatic plot, and how the emphasis on the theatrical apparatus questions the primacy of dramatis personae and the theatrical illusion. Readings of dramatic texts and analyses of performance videos are accompanied by discussions of theoretical texts on performativity, theatricality, and subjectification. Topics include the history of theater, play, and drama; conceptions of performance and theatricality; subjectivity and authority; and the reentry of the text within the theatrical play.

Course is multi titled as GMAN663

Instructor: Katrin Trüstedt

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: Thursday 3:30p.m. - 5:20pm

CPLT 587: World Literature

The concept of world literature, from its origins in eighteenth-century cosmopolitanism represented by Herder and Goethe up to contemporary critical debates (Apter, Casanova, Cheah, Damrosch, Dharwadker, I. Hesse, Moretti, Mufti, Pollock, Said, Spivak). World literature in relation to national literature, German-language, and Jewish literature; translation, untranslatability, the effect of markets, diaspora, politics. Literary critical readings supplemented by exemplary literary texts in multiple genres. Student contributions based on individual linguistic backgrounds.

Course is multi titled as GMAN713/LITR406/GMAN411/HUMS342

Instructors: Kirk Wetters, Hannan Hever

Professor: Hannan Hever
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: Wednesday, 3:30p.m.-5:20p.m.

CPLT 589: Walter Benjamin and the Modernization of 19th Century Paris

The radical modernization of Paris under the Second Empire (1851–70) as seen through the eyes of Walter Benjamin. Focus on Benjamin’s Arcades Project, a compendium that charted developments such as Parisian mass transit and streamlined traffic, the construction of apartment houses, and the dissemination of mass media. Readings from other literary texts on the same events include works by Balzac, Zola, and Aragon.

Course is multi titled as GMAN645/LITR307/GMAN374

Instructor: Henry Sussman

Professor: Henry Sussman
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: Tuesday, 3:20p.m.-5:20p.m.

CPLT 591: Vergil's Aeneid

A close reading of selected books of the epic, concentrating on Vergilian poetics. Particular themes include intertextuality; figures of speech and thought; narrative structure and meaning; repetition; ekphrasis and simile; the relationship between poetics and politics. Weekly readings include key secondary material that has shaped the interpretation of the poem.

Students should read the whole poem in Latin before the seminar begins.

Course is multi titled as CLSS857

Instructor: Christina Kraus, David Quint

Professor: David Quint
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: Wednesday, 2:30p.m.-4:30p.m.

CPLT 620: Apocalypticism: Ancient and Modern

This seminar reviews the origins of apocalyptic thought in the three great monotheistic religions (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam) and also considers the modern adaptations of apocalypticism in each tradition.

Course is multi titled with HIST574/REL546/RLST813

Instructors: Abbas Amanat, John Collins

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: Wednesday 1:30p.m.-3:20p.m.

CPLT 621: Books, Displays, and Systems Theory

A status report on the book as a medium in an age of cybernetic technology and virtual reality. The contentious no-man’s-land between books and contemporary systems.

Course multi titled with GMAN602

Instructor: Henry Sussman

Professor: Henry Sussman
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: Monday, Wednesday 4:00p.m.-5:15p.m.

CPLT 622: Working Group on Globalization and Culture

A continuing collective research project, a cultural studies “laboratory,” that has been running since the fall of 2003. The group, made up of graduate students and faculty from several disciplines, meet regularly to discuss common readings, to develop collective and individual research projects, and to present that research publicly. The general theme for the working group is globalization and culture, with three principal aspects: (1) the globalization of cultural industries and goods, and its consequences or patterns of everyday life as well as for forms of fiction, film, broadcasting, and music; (2) the trajectories of social movements and their relation to patterns of migration, the rise of global cities, the transformation of labor processes, and forms of ethnic, class, and gender conflict; (3) the emergence of and debates within transnational social and cultural theory. The specific focus, projects, and directions of the working group are determined by the interests, expertise, and ambitions of the members of the group, and change as its members change. 

There are a small number of openings for second-year graduate students. Students interested in participating should contact michael.denning@yale.edu

Multi titled as AMST622

Professor: Michael Denning
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: Monday, 1:00p.m. - 3:20p.m.

CPLT 653: Comparative Creole Literatures: Indian Ocean, North Africa, Caribbean

This course brings the literary and linguistic-political development of Creole literatures in the Indian Ocean, principally Mauritius, into conversation with similar developments in the Caribbean, especially Martinique. We also juxtapose North African literature, where French coexists with literary Arabic and colloquial Arabic.

Instructor: Shawkat Toorawa

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2017

CPLT 654: Classics: The Arabic-Islamic World

Survey of the literary tradition of the Arabic-Islamic world (West Asia, North Africa, and Muslim Spain). Prose and poetry from the Qur’an to the Arabian Nights; attention to the interdependence of the works and their cultural setting, the agendas authors pursued, and the characters they portrayed.

Course multi titled as LITR178/NELC156/NELC556/MMES201/HUMS233

Instructor: Shawkat Toorawa

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: Wednesday, Friday 2:30p.m.-3:45p.m.

CPLT 673: Golden Age Theater

The development and apogee of the Spanish comedia, as well as contemporary minor subgenres such as the auto sacramental and the entremés. Exploration of how the theater synthesizes post-Garcilaso lyric, the commedia dell’arte, renaissance epic, the romancero, Spanish history, and the European renaissance literary tradition. Works by Cervantes, Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, Guillén de Castro, Mira de Amescua, Juan Ruiz de Alarcón, Luis Quiñones de Benavente, Pedro Calderón de la Barca, and Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz. Comparison with English and French theater is encouraged.

Course is multi titled as SPAN629

Instructor: Roberto González Echevarría

Course Type: Graduate
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 1:00p.m.-2:15p.m.

CPLT 675: El Quijote en español

A detailed and contextualized reading of Cervantes’s masterpiece conducted entirely in Spanish. The study of this iconic text familiarizes students with its literary and cultural values and Cervantes’s language.

Course multi titled as SPAN660/SPAN302

Instructor: Roberto González Echevarría

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: Tuesday, Thursday 2:30p.m.-3:45p.m.

CPLT 683: Jewish History and Thought to Early Modern Times

A broad introduction to the history of the Jews from biblical beginnings until the European Reformation and the Ottoman Empire. Focus on the formative period of classical rabbinic Judaism and on the symbiotic relationships among Jews, Christians, and Muslims. Jewish society and culture in its biblical, rabbinic, and medieval settings.

Course multi titled as ER&M219/RLST773/HIST596/JDST761/HIST219/JDST200/MMES149/RLST148

Instructor: Ivan Marcus

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: Tuesday, Thursday 11:35a.m.-12:50p.m.

CPLT 699: Heidegger's Being and Time

A systematic, chapter-by-chapter study of Heidegger’s Being and Time, arguably the most important work of philosophy of the twentieth century. All the major themes of the book are addressed in detail, with a particular emphasis on care, time, death, and the meaning of being.

Course multi titled as PHIL602/GMAN603

Instructor: Martin Hägglund

Professor: Martin Hägglund
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: Monday, Wednesday 11:35a.m.-12:50p.m.

CPLT 705: The Decameron

An in-depth study of Boccaccio’s text as a journey in genre in which the writer surveys all the storytelling possibilities available to him in the current repertory of short narrative fiction—ranging from ennobling example to flamboyant fabliaux, including hagiography, aphorisms, romances, anecdotes, tragedies, and practical jokes—and self-consciously manipulates those forms to create a new literary space of astonishing variety, vitality, and subversive power. In the relationship between the elaborate frame-story and the embedded tales, theoretical issues of considerable contemporary interest emerge—questions of gendered discourse, narratology, structural pastiche, and reader response among them. The Decameron is read in Italian or in English. Close attention is paid to linguistic usage and rhetorical techniques in this foundational text of the vernacular prose tradition.

Course multi titled as ITAL781

Instructor: Millicent Marcus

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: Wednesday 3:30p.m.-5:20p.m.

CPLT 706: The New Map of the World: Vico's Poetic Philosophy

This course examines Vico’s thought globally and in the historical context of the late Renaissance and the Baroque. Starting with Vico’s Autobiography, working to his University Inaugural Orations, On the Study of Methods of Our Time, the seminar delves into his juridical-political texts and submits the second New Science (1744) to a detailed analysis. Some attention is given to Vico’s poetic production and the encomia he wrote. The overarching idea of the seminar is the definition of Vico’s new discourse for the modern age. To this end, discussion deals prominently with issues such as Baroque encyclopedic representations, the heroic imagination, the senses of “discovery,” the redefinition of “science,” the reversal of neo-Aristotelian and neo-Platonic poetics, the crisis of the Renaissance, and the role of the myth.

Course multi titled as ITAL700

Instructor: Giuseppe Mazzotta

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: Tuesday 3:30p.m.-5:20p.m.

CPLT 725: Postcolonial Theory and Its Literature

A survey of theories relevant to colonial and postcolonial literature and culture. The course focuses on theoretical models (Orientalism, hybridity, métissage, créolité, “minor literature”), but also gives attention to the literary texts from which they are derived (francophone and anglophone). Readings from Said, Bhabha, Spivak, Mbembe, Amselle, Glissant, Deleuze, Guattari. Conducted in English.

Course multi titled as FREN946/AFST747/AFAM846

Instructor: Christopher Miller

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: Thursday 1:30pm.m-3:20p.m.

CPLT 843: Methods in Book History: The Early Modern Book in Manuscript and Print

This course offers a collections-based introduction to the material culture of the early modern book in print and manuscript, while exploring questions of evidence, canonicity, disciplinary formation, and the social construction of knowledge. Focusing primarily on early modern Britain and Yale’s British collections, the course offers students a detailed understanding of English paleography and bibliography, early modern manuscript and print culture, and the disciplinary histories that have informed the collection and study of early modern British texts.

Course multi titled as HIST614

Instructor: Kathryn James

Professor: Kathryn James
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: Friday 9:25a.m.-11:15a.m.

CPLT 855: Modernism, Realism, Imperial Crisis

An investigation of the connections between the crises of realism and the historical novel, the emergence of high modernism, magical realism, and various forms of postcolonial historical narrative considered in the wider global context of inter-imperial conflict, anti-imperial struggle, and the restructuring of the world capitalist system. The seminar combines literary readings, critical theory, and contemporary studies on “world literature” to explore ruptures and developments in modern fiction and the politics of empire in Europe, the Caribbean, Latin America, and Asia.

Instructor: Joseph Cleary

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: Monday 3:30p.m.-5:20p.m.

CPLT 882: What Happened to Race, Class, and Gender? Keywords of Recent Critical Theory

What did happen to race, class, and gender? This course examines the persistence of older theoretical frameworks such as Marxism or feminism in current critical discourse. It also explores new critical keywords—biopolitics, affect, the Anthropocene, and others—that now help structure theoretical debates in the humanities. Intended as a fast-paced, reading-heavy introduction to recent critical theory, the course will help graduate students in literature acquire a better sense of their field of study and reflect upon the methodologies they will use in their dissertation projects. Readings include the work of older theorists such as Jacques Derrida, Theodor Adorno, Michel Foucault, Judith Butler, and Donna Haraway, as well as recent ones such as Jasbir Puar, Sianne Ngai, Tiqqun, Paolo Virno, and Dipesh Chakrabarty.

Course is multi titled as RUSS882/ENGL709

Instructors: Marta Figlerowicz, Ayesha Ramachandran

Professor: Marta Figlerowicz, Professor: Ayesha Ramachandran
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: Monday 1:30p.m.-3:20p.m.

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