Graduate Courses

CPLT 511: Intro to Theory of Literature

An examination of concepts and assumptions in contemporary views of literature. Theories of meaning, interpretation, and representation. Critical analysis of formalist, psychoanalytic, structuralist, poststructuralist, Marxist, and feminist approaches to theory and literature. 

Course is crosslisted as ENGL300/LITR300

Professor: Martin Hägglund
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2016
Day/Time: Monday & Wedneday, 3:30p.m. - 4:20pm

CPLT 533: Illegitimacy

Theoretical exploration of legitimacy as a fundamental historical, legal, and political concept; works by Weber, Schmitt, Blumenberg, and Luhmann. Literary readings on illegitimacy in the specific sense “born out of wedlock”; authors include Shakespeare, Goethe, Kleist, Dostoevsky, and Gide.

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2016
Day/Time: Wednesday 3:30p.m.-5:20p.m.

Theoretical exploration of legitimacy as a fundamental historical, legal, and political concept; works by Weber, Schmitt, Blumenberg, and Luhmann. Literary readings on illegitimacy in the specific sense “born out of wedlock”; authors include Shakespeare, Goethe, Kleist, Dostoevsky, and Gide.

Course is crosslisted as LITR429/GMAN630/GMAN364

Course Type: Graduate
Day/Time: Wednesday, 3:30p.m. - 5:20p.m

CPLT 536: Around Kafka

Franz Kafka’s writings viewed as a site for the radical questioning and dislocation of Western systems, institutions, and mores of the early twentieth century. Attention to the shorter fiction, the novels, the letters, and their strategic interrelations; examination of the fields of knowledge, ideological presumptions, and aesthetic and cultural experiments that Kafka touched, and to some degree deranged, with his writing.

Course is crosslisted as GMAN327/LITR229/GMAN536

Professor: Henry Sussman
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2016
Day/Time: Wednesday, 1:30p.m. - 3:20p.m.

CPLT 586: Knowing Fiction

Fiction and related prose pieces in which the relationships between narration, fiction, understanding, and knowing play a critical role. Focus on works by Western writers of the nineteenth century through the present. The texts’ theoretical implications and implicit self-definitions; the import of concepts such as truth, fiction, self-consciousness, perception, science, and narrative.

Professor: Carol Jacobs
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2016
Day/Time: Monday 1:30p.m. - 3:20p.m.

CPLT 589: Walter Benjamin and the Modernization of Nineteenth-Century Paris

The radical modernization of Paris under the Second Empire (1851–70) as seen through the eyes of Walter Benjamin. Focus on Benjamin’s Arcades Project, a compendium that charted developments such as Parisian mass transit and streamlined traffic, the construction of apartment houses, and the dissemination of mass media. Readings from other literary texts on the same events include works by Balzac, Zola, and Aragon.

Course is crosslisted as GMAN645, LITR307, GMAN374

Professor: Henry Sussman
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2016
Day/Time: Monday 3:30p.m. - 5:20p.m.

CPLT 595: Passions, 1600–1800

Theories of passion from Descartes, Spinoza, and Hobbes to Burke, Adam Smith, and Kant. The relationship between passion and its representation in art and literature: Alberti, Raphael, Rembrandt; Shakespeare; Poussin, Marino; Sandart, LeBrun; Greuze, Diderot, Lessing, Goethe, and others. In the background, discussion of contemporary history and theory of emotion.

Course is crosslisted as HSAR644 and GMAN677

Professor: Rudiger Campe
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2016
Day/Time: Tuesday, 1:30p.m. - 3:20p.m.

CPLT 622: Working Group on Globalization and Culture

A continuing collective research project, a cultural studies “laboratory,” that has been running since the fall of 2003. The group, made up of graduate students and faculty from several disciplines, meet regularly to discuss common readings, to develop collective and individual research projects, and to present that research publicly. The general theme for the working group is globalization and culture, with three principal aspects: (1) the globalization of cultural industries and goods, and its consequences or patterns of everyday life as well as for forms of fiction, film, broadcasting, and music; (2) the trajectories of social movements and their relation to patterns of migration, the rise of global cities, the transformation of labor processes, and forms of ethnic, class, and gender conflict; (3) the emergence of and debates within transnational social and cultural theory. The specific focus, projects, and directions of the working group are determined by the interests, expertise, and ambitions of the members of the group, and change as its members change. 

There are a small number of openings for second-year graduate students. Students interested in participating should contact michael.denning@yale.edu

Crosslisted as AMST623

Professor: Michael Denning
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2016
Day/Time: Monday, 2:30p.m. - 4:20p.m.

CPLT 629: Nietzsche and His Readers

Reading and discussion of Friedrich Nietzsche’s major texts, as well as critiques and interpretations by some of his most influential twentieth-century readers.

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2016
Day/Time: Tuesday 3:30p.m. - 5:20p.m.

CPLT 672: Milton

This course studies Milton’s poetry and some of his controversial prose. We investigate the relation of the poetry to its historical contexts, focusing on the literary, religious, social, and political forces that shaped Milton’s verse. We survey and assess some of the dominant issues in contemporary Milton studies, examining the types of readings that psychoanalytic, feminist, Marxist, and historicist critics have produced. A brief oral report and term paper (as well as a prospectus and preliminary bibliography for the term paper) required.

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2016
Day/Time: Tuesday 9.25a.m. - 11:15a.m.

CPLT 716: German New Waves in Cold War Europe

Before 1961, Berlin was the best place in Europe to follow both Eastern and Western Europe’s emerging cinematic New Waves. And first in East, then in West Germany, young filmmakers developed distinctive approaches to political and documentary filmmaking, to the Nazi past and the Cold War, to class, gender, and social transformation. The course juxtaposes the two German New Waves, focusing on aesthetic ferment, institutional barriers, and transformation. Features, documentaries, and experimental films by Gerhard Klein, Konrad Wolf, Alexander Kluge, Herbert Vesley, Edgar Reitz, Jean-Marie Straub, and Danièle Huillet, Jürgen Böttcher, Heiner Carow, Frank Beyer, Wim Wenders, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Helke Sander, Helke Misselwitz, read against other Eastern and Western New Wave films (i.e., by Lindsay Anderson, Karel Reisz, Andrzej Munk, Alain Resnais, Mikhail Kalatozov, Milos Forman).

Crosslisted as GMAN730/FILM729/FILM419/LITR382.

Professor: Katie Trumpener
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2016
Day/Time: Monday, 7:00p.m. - 11:00p.m. & Tuesday 1:30p.m. - 3:20p.m.

CPLT 811: Reproducing Christianity: Gender, Genre, and Religions in the works of Torquato Tasso

A seminar on Torquato Tasso, whose works and life inspired Guarini, Marino, Monteverdi, Shakespeare, Spenser, Montaigne, Poussin, Guercino, and many other early modern writers and artists. Fundamental to an understanding of Tasso is an understanding of the world he lived in: one that was redefining Catholicism in a splintered Europe, newly engaged in the project of colonialism, aggressively countering the Ottoman empire, and wrestling with the meaning of artistic production. We also engage with some of Tasso’s most important literary and critical sources—Homer, Virgil, Ariosto, chronicles of the First Crusade, a newly discovered Poetics—in order to assess his revolutionary contribution to the contested genre that he made his own, epic poetry. We focus primarily on Tasso’s masterpiece, Gerusalemme liberata, his account of Europe still united under a pope, and the agonized revisions he made to the poem over a decade, resulting in the Gerusalemme conquistata. We explore the details of a life that Tasso himself described as that of a “pellegrino” and exile as his own displacements, obsessions, and longing for a homeland found themselves echoed in his poetry. How did Tasso’s transformation and theorization of epic poetry in turn affect the poetry, paintings, and music of his successors—a question raised at the end of the term as we turn to the Carracci’s and Poussin’s reproductions of scenes from the Liberata and to Shakespeare’s Tempest. Readings in Italian; optional assignments in Italian.

Crosslisted as ITAL605

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2016
Day/Time: Monday, 1:30p.m.-3:20p.m.

CPLT 900: Directed Reading

3HTBA

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2016

CPLT 901: Individual Research

3 HTBA

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2016

CPLT 925: The Practice of Literary Translation

Intensive readings in the history and theory of translation paired with practice in translating. Case studies form ancient languages (the Bible, Greek and Latin classics), medieval languages (classical Arabic and Persian literature), and modern languages (European poetic texts).

Crosslisted as JDST316/ENGL456/HUMS427/LITR348

Professor: Peter Cole
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2016
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 1:00p.m. - 2:15p.m.

CPLT 940: Magical Realism and Its Sequels in Modern Latin American Fiction

The course concentrates on the major writers who practiced what is called “magical realism”—Alejo Carpentier, Gabriel García Márquez, Carlos Fuentes, and others—after studying the trend’s antecedents in the colonial, post-independence, and early twentieth century. The role of Jorge Luis Borges in the beginnings of magical realism, the works of writers such as Miguel Ángel Asturias and Juan Rulfo, and those of more recent writers who rejected the trend, such as Roberto Bolaño and Fernando Vallejo. The considerable critical corpus on the topic is studied. In Spanish.

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2016
Day/Time: Wednesday 3:30p.m. - 5:20p.m.