Publications

Skirting the Ethical
Carol Jacobs
Publication Year: 2008
Description:

Readings of six works, each noted for its politico-ethical stance. The first four (Sophocles’ Antigone, Plato’s Symposium and Republic Hamann’s “Aesthetica in nuce” have a recognized place in the canon. The last two, Sebald’s The Emigrants and Jane Campion’s The Piano are exemplary for our contemporary scene.  The straight-forward assumptions about justice, divine and state power, the good, and identity politics that every reader or viewer inevitably comes upon are disrupted when one takes into account the role of language. What emerges is a non-prescriptive ethics of another order.

Radical Atheism: Derrida and the Time of Life
Martin Hägglund
Publication Year: 2008
Description:

Radical Atheism presents a profound new reading of the influential French philosopher Jacques Derrida. Against the prevalent notion that there was an ethical or religious “turn” in Derrida’s thinking, Hägglund argues that a radical atheism informs Derrida’s work from beginning to end. Proceeding from Derrida’s insight into the constitution of time, Hägglund demonstrates how Derrida rethinks the condition of identity, ethics, religion, and political emancipation in accordance with the logic of radical atheism. Hägglund challenges other major interpreters of Derrida’s work and offers a compelling account of Derrida’s thinking on life and death, good and evil, self and other.

Popular Front Paris and the Poetics of Culture
Dudley Andrew
Publication Year: 2005
Description:

A analysis on the decade of the 1930s in the form of a newspaper, with sections treating simultaneous happenings in politics (the Stavisky affair), entertainment (music halls), literature (Celine and Malraux), travel (colonialism),fashion (photography),spectacles (expositions, cinema), and so on. Key films open each section and provide an iconography and themes. This book argues for a new historiography of periods.

Love and the Law in Cervantes
Roberto González Echevarría
Publication Year: 2005
Description:

The consolidation of law and the development of legal writing during Spain’s Golden Age not only helped that country become a modern state but also affected its great literature. In this fascinating book, Roberto González Echevarría explores the works of Cervantes, showing how his representations of love were inspired by examples of human deviance and desire culled from legal discourse. González Echevarría describes Spain’s new legal policies, legislation, and institutions and explains how, at the same time, its literature became filled with love stories derived from classical and medieval sources.

Failure, Nationalism, and Literature: The Making of Modern Chinese Identity, 1895-1937
Jing Tsu
Publication Year: 2005
Description:

How often do we think of cultural humiliation and failure as strengths? Against prevailing views on what it means to enjoy power as individuals, cultures, or nations, this provocative book looks at the making of cultural and national identities in modern China as building success on failure. It reveals the exercise of sovereign power where we least expect it and shows how this is crucial to our understanding of a modern world of conflict, violence, passionate suffering, and cultural difference.

Cervantes’s Novel of Modern Times: A New Reading of Don Quijote
David Quint
Publication Year: 2003
Description:

The book demonstrates the unity of Don Quijote, organized through the technique of interlace. The novel’s episodes and interpolated stories mirror and comment on one another in a carefully constructed design that describes the historical transition from feudal society to a world of money and nascent capitalism.

Crítica práctica/práctica crítica
Roberto González Echevarría
Publication Year: 2002
Description:

A result of his fruitful work as a researcher and critic of Latin American literature, González Echevarría presents a collection of insightful essays in which he analyses, with great clarity, the narrative works of the Latin American authors represented, from el Inca Garcilaso de la Vega and Pedro Mártir de Anglería to Gabriel García Márquez, Jorge Luis Borges, Alejo Carpentier and Severo Sarduy, who contributed to the creation of a universal Latin American voice.

Producing the Modern Hebrew Canon: Nation Building and Minority Discourse
Hannan Hever
Publication Year: 2001
Description:

A people’s writings can play a dramatic role in nation building, as the development of modern Hebrew literature powerfully illustrates. Since the end of the nineteenth century, Hebrew writers in Europe and Palestine/Israel have produced texts and consolidated moments in the shaping of national identity.

The Soviet Novel
Katerina Clark
Publication Year: 2000
Description:

A dynamic account of the socialist realist novel’s evolution as seen in the context of Soviet culture. A new Afterword brings the history of Socialist Realism to its end at the close of the 20th century.

The Pride of Havana: A History of Cuban Baseball
Roberto González Echevarría
Publication Year: 1999
Description:

From the first amateur leagues of the 1860s to the exploits of Livan and Orlando “El Duque” Hernandez, here is the definitive history of baseball in Cuba. Roberto Gonzalez Echevarria expertly traces the arc of the game, intertwining its heroes and their stories with the politics, music, dance, and literature of the Cuban people. What emerges is more than a story of balls and strikes, but a richly detailed history of Cuba told from the unique cultural perch of the baseball diamond.

In the Language of Walter Benjamin
Carol Jacobs
Publication Year: 1999
Description:

This book insists on Benjamin’s method of philosophical contemplation as performance, on a performance that demands precise immersion in the minute details of its subject matter. Readings of some of his key works: the autobiographical Berlin Chronicle, the apparently biographical study of Proust, the fictional autobiographical story “Myslowitz—Braunschweig—Marseille,” and those essays on the theory of language so crucial to an understanding of Benjamin, “The Task of the Translator,” “Doctrine of the Similar,” and “On Language as Such and on the Language of Man.”

Petersburg: Crucible of Cultural Revolution
Katerina Clark
Publication Year: 1998
Description:

In this new book, Katerina Clark does not attempt to account for such a devolution by looking at the broad political arena. Rather, she follows the quest of intellectuals through these years to embody the Revolution, a focus that casts new light on the formation of Stalinism. This revisionist work takes issue with many existing cultural histories by resisting the temptation to structure its narrative as a saga of the oppressive regime versus the benighted intellectuals.

Pages